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Author Topic: ASR feasibility study  (Read 1727 times)

Pegasus

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ASR feasibility study
« on: November 11, 2008, 07:13:38 AM »

The full report can be downloaded by copying and pasting the following link

(ftp://coastaltechcorp-ftp.com) into your internet browser.
The username is Brevard ASR and there is no password. 
Be sure to use capital letters as shown.  Please note that some of the files are quite large. Also see attached.

John Hearin has produced a product that has warranted a feasibility study with subsequent review regarding the building of a artificial surfing reef here in Brevard county.
John is  a member of our fledgling chapter and I am proud of his involvement. I have seen him in action distributing trash bags on the beach and volunteering his time supporting surfrider events. He helps our chapter understand wave science beyond the scope of ASR. Our chapter benefits greatly from his knowledge. We are fortunate to have him.
 
John Hearin has started dialog within local and state government demonstrating the importance of surfing within our state. The simple fact that a surfing reef is even considered is a major break through.
 
Regardless of the study findings or whether a ASR is eventually built, we will still have  degraded waves.
Our nonsurfable waves here in Cocoa Beach is a result of the by pass and fill nourishment and have proven to reduce the total surfable wave count by 50+ % with no improvement in sight
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Please take the time to review the studies findings as we all need information to make decisions regarding our coastal environment,
 
 
Policy on Artificial Surfing Reefs
http://www.surfrider.org/policy_areefs.asp
 
February 6, 2005

"The Surfrider Foundation opposes any degradation or depletion of existing artificial or natural wave-riding resources due to the development of man made structures or activities in the coastal zone. In all instances, any development that results in the loss of the resource must be avoided.

If experimental or artificial reefs are constructed, to restore already lost or damaged wave-riding resources, a thorough environmental impact analysis along with a monitoring and research component must be an integral part of the process. This must include baseline and long-term post project monitoring of nearshore coastal processes, ecological impacts and recreational conditions."

 

« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 07:15:50 AM by Pegasus »
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roger

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2008, 07:04:20 PM »

drop the word "nourishment" and use the more correct, "dredge" and "fill" or "dump".

:)
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Pegasus

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2008, 07:26:41 PM »

See you at the meeting Roger.
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roger

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2008, 08:04:43 PM »

Yeah, I'll be bolting straight from work, but I should get there in time.
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Pegasus

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2008, 07:04:24 AM »

Regardless of the study findings or whether a ASR is eventually built, we will still have  degraded waves.
Our nonsurfable waves here in Cocoa Beach is a result of the by pass and fill nourishment and have proven to reduce the total surfable wave count by 50+ % with no improvement in sight.

Notice any change ?
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McTiki

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2008, 07:26:53 AM »

"Notice any change ?"

Yeah, this thread now has 5 replies  :high:

See ya at the meeting.
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RoosterJaws

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2008, 09:25:57 AM »

Regardless of the study findings or whether a ASR is eventually built, we will still have  degraded waves.
Our nonsurfable waves here in Cocoa Beach is a result of the by pass and fill nourishment and have proven to reduce the total surfable wave count by 50+ % with no improvement in sight.

Notice any change ?

I know we were looking at older maps of the area's in question yesterday, but I was also wondering what the swell models have been doing in this
area as well over the years?  As stated the ASR will not create swell, nor will the sand by-pass, are we still getting the swell to push a wave in if
either objectives are accomplished  :think2:
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Pegasus

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2008, 07:04:39 AM »

Bump for tonight

A workshop regarding the findings of the Feasibility Study for the artificial surf reef will be held; Wednesday, November 19th 6:30 -8:00 pm in the Florida Room of the Viera Government Center 2725 Judge Jamieson Way, Building C Viera

Press Release
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reefs

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2008, 05:11:27 PM »

Today's FL Today article


Engineers at odds about artificial reef
Project would create better surfing waves off Cocoa Beach

A Melbourne coastal engineering firm says building an artificial surfing reef just south of Cocoa Beach Pier would likely cost too much to justify.

While not dead in the water just yet, the proposed $5.7 million reef to make longer-lasting surfing waves and to blunt beach erosion won't bring enough of an economic benefit to pay for itself, Coastal Tech concluded.

But another consultant, the one that designed the proposed reef and also contributed to Coastal's study, has called the firm's conclusions way off base.

County officials plan to have a workshop about the study today in Viera.

The V-shaped reef, made from sand-filled geotextile bags, would cost about $5.7 million to build, plus almost $1 million in design, permitting and ongoing monitoring.

Waves would ride up the bump formed on the ocean floor by the sand-filled bags, on some days growing 20 percent to 30 percent higher than they do now.

Walker Dawson, a staff engineer with Coastal Tech, said the reef would deliver better surfing waves, but the erosion control and economic benefits would likely not be enough to justify the project.

The estimated yearly benefit would be $221,410, while the annual cost would reach at least $499,095, according to Coastal Tech.

County officials had hoped such a reef might help block erosion, reducing the frequency of expensive dredging projects to shore up nearby beaches.

"There's no doubt that there will be improved surfing conditions associated with an artificial reef," Dawson said. "The one element that is just not clearly defined, and has yet to be clearly defined, is the artificial reef's ability to reduce return (beach sand) fill intervals."

The V-shaped reef could attract fish but also could cause minor damage to the seafloor beneath, the study concluded.

But John Hearin, who designed the reef, says Coastal Tech underestimated the reef's ability to improve surfing waves.

"We disagree with most of the major findings in that report," said Hearin, the North American representative for ASR Limited, a New Zealand-based company that has built similar reefs.

"The big factor is how many days will the reef improve surfing," Hearin said.

"Coastal (Tech) is saying 34 days, which we think is way too low. We're basing ours (benefit-cost ratio) on 204 days."

That would improve recreation opportunities and attract more surfing events, he said.

Coastal Tech predicts the reef would prevent about 17,000 cubic yards of beach erosion annually.

Hearin says it would be as much as 19,700 cubic yards.

Only four such reefs have been completed worldwide: two in Australia, one in New Zealand and one in California, and only one was built for surfing and erosion control.

Last year, county commissioners hired Coastal Tech to conduct an $82,500 study to determine what type of reef would work best, at what location and how to build it.

Commissioners also approved a $12,290 study by Praecipio EFS of Brevard to examine the economic impacts of a surfing reef.

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lawless

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Re: ASR feasibility study
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2008, 12:53:46 PM »

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