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Author Topic: THE BANANA RIVER  (Read 4508 times)

slideaway

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THE BANANA RIVER
« on: June 07, 2013, 01:07:57 AM »

Hey 16streets... right now I'm out in Malibu and a 20+ second swell is rolling in. Crowd was thick this AM but when you launched from the right spot and no one dropped in, you could take it from the outside to the sand, maybe 200 yards, maybe more. Would have loved it if Dan and Shadow and MacLaren and Mayo and Mark and Jesse were out today. As it was, three hours with the wife... both of us caught some epic rides.

Anyway, here's my latest offering in the Resident. If you live near the Banana River, I beg you to read it and share it on Facebook or do whatever people do to get the word heard.

A PLAGUE ON OUR RIVER

Thanks all,

D
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jt

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2013, 07:12:51 AM »

that's sad.... (not the 200 yard long ride part)



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RoosterJaws

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2013, 12:55:49 PM »

Just had a flashback of Slater tearing that place up on a twin fin.  Then clicked on the link and saw the dead manatee  :sad:
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brownbus

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2013, 06:06:19 PM »

sweet report...Would love to surf there, but, with the folks mentioned above, not 200 of LA's most spoiled...;)

sad story about the Lagoon system...Still the Lagoon is a big part of 'home'. We miss 'home' and can't wait to move back in the Fall...
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ccb_dan

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2013, 02:46:17 PM »

Hey Dan!

Stoked you got some good ones out there!  Lord knows it can be a challenge to get waves to yourself in that neck of the woods. 

The article is saddening for sure, I have been paddling the 1,000 Islands with my daughter a lot recently and she is in complete awe about the place.  We crouch down low and take "tunnels" through the mangroves then her jaw opens wide as we spill out into secluded lagoons only 2 feet deep.  Schools of Reds and Drum all over the place.

In fact we paddled it this morning (saw Shadow and the missus too).  Such an amazing and entirely unique place.  What a shame it would be to lose it.

While the article is unsettling, thank you for bringing the issue to light.
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ccb_dan

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2013, 07:14:13 AM »

We paddled the 1,000 Islands for 2 hours yesterday morning and had a great time.  I found myself looking at the bottom a lot and taking notice of the seagrass versus algae growth....very interesting.  The wildlife seems to still be flourishing though as we saw some pink Spoon Bills, Blue Herons, Osprey. 

My daughter made me do an about face because she saw a huge shell, we checked it out and this was the biggest snail I have ever seen.  Shell was probably 7" long and the snail couldn't fit inside it, he was oozing out.  We put him back and continued on.
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Walker D

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2013, 10:28:39 AM »

So I went to the Brevard Marine Advisory Council Meeting last night where Don Dies (expert coastal ecologist) presented on the condition of the Sebastian Inlet flood shoal sea grasses and the performance of some seagrass transplanting activities that have taken place.

Of course the discussion moved towards the condition of the Banana River and Indian River in Central Brevard. It was very interesting to here his take on things. It is still very much unclear exactly what has caused the 'superbloom' and seagrass die off.

Don hypothesized that the extreme cold temps in 2010-2011 changed the Banana River and Indian River Lagoon systems from 'drift algae systems' to 'phytoplankton systems'. Don't ask. I don't have any idea what that means. I think it has something to do with how the seagrasses reproduce in our rivers.

Good news is there are clear signs of recovery occuring. It appears that the Lagoon is coming outta its 'funk'.

The bad news is that a similar situation occurred in Florida Bay back in the late 80s and it took 20 years for the Bay to fully recover. Don indicated that he would expect full recovery of the Indian River Lagoon to take about that long...
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jt

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2013, 11:12:16 AM »

Well thats positive news at least.
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big rick

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2013, 11:14:30 AM »

couldn't the fact that a greater sense of technology,
more human interaction (the people trying to help)
with the lagoon, and a greater knowledge of science,
particularly earth science, play a greater roll in 'fixing'
the problem faster?

or am i just speaking out of my ass?
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9AMdp

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2013, 11:25:22 AM »

Ya, that time estimate sounds about right;
if, we can get nutrient input under control.  See FDEPs TMDL/BMAP process.

Support the fertilizer ban.  Why?

Beachside we're "built out".  No more space available for stormwater treatment
and much of the development is pre-stormwater rule so no treatment at all.
The only option to decrease what's in the runoff that is going to hit the Lagoon
is to decrease what we put into it.
FWIW, also check the fishing section of 2ndlite for more dicussion.  (believe it or not)

Would like more info on the transplant / reestablishment program.  Is Bethune College doing that study?

Short answer on the drift algae to phytoplankton community is that nitrogen and phosphorus (limiting nutrients)
exist in "pools" in the environment.  Conditions of cold and hypersalinity thought to have killed drift algae,
allowing that pool of nutrient to move out of the drift algae "pool" via decay and into another pool.
Conditions at the time favored phytoplankton (they grow fast) so they "bloomed" (got the nutrients)
and shaded out / killed the seagrass.  Dead / decaying seagrass gave up their nutients too, now also in phytoplankton "pool". 
Tough to reverse.  Needs some flushing and a long term reduction of the incoming nutrient load. 

Sorry to be so long winded.   :-[

Where's my soapbox?

 :soapbox:  ;D
« Last Edit: August 16, 2013, 11:29:43 AM by 9AMdp »
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Walker D

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2013, 02:30:47 PM »

The transplant program is something that is being done in very small areas on the Sebastian Inlet flood shoals. Sebastian Inlet District is behind the effort. This is part of the channel extension project that was done a few years back. Mitigation and monitoring. All that fun stuff.

Interestingly enough the 'hot spots' for the superbloom are the Banana River and central Indian River. Apparently seagrasses in the very north end of the Indian River in Titusville are flourishing, as well as, down in the Vero area. The donor site for the seagrass transplanting is adjacent to the 17th street bridge in Vero.

In terms of technology, the same question came up during the BMAC meeting. Everyone is very reluctant to invest tons of resources into transplanting seagrasses when they aren't exactly sure what happened or if the transplanted seagrass will be successful.

Another piece of information that caught my attention was something Ernie Brown mentioned. He noted that studies have shown that 50% of the nutrient loading to the IRL comes from groundwater. I was suprised by that figure. Not that I know anything about nutrient loading on bodies of water. Just seemed much higher than I would have guessed.
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Pegasus

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2013, 06:37:28 PM »

Was there any talk of a human waste isotope findings ?
New data is emerging as we speak.
I go into the "death zone" of the Banana river daily and see signs of resiliency, but the lagoon is losing its ability to handle historical seasonal temp variations.
Watch what happens this Winter/ Spring.
But then again, what the fuck do I know.
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9AMdp

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2013, 08:29:37 PM »

As far as the isotopes that indicate human waste go, that a bit of a stretch IMHO.
The isotopes concerned are stable nitrogen isotope ratios 15N:14N
expressed as a relative comparison to the existing ratio in the atmosphere
and sometimes called "delta 15 N" written as d for delta d15N.
Basically, due to fractionation by biological processes,
waste nitrogen will have a higher ratio of the heavy isotope by a few ppm than the atmosphere will.
So, if we set the atmosphere to "0",  highly enriched d15N will look like maybe 20ppm in treated domestic wastewater (reuse water for example).
What we're seeing in the Lagoon and tributaries is less than 20ppm, in the range of 6-8ppm in the studies I've done. 
So if the environment is equilibrium with the atmosphere, 0, back of the envelope
would suggest that maybe 1/3 of the problem nitrogen is from animal waste (some say septic tanks)
but unfortunately it's not that easy. 
Residence time, natural fractionation, etc. all add to the "mix" (haha!)
Just another tidbit, fertilizer nitrogen is also around 0ppm because it's manufactured from atmospheric nitrogen so it's tough to distinguish from "natural".
All fun. 
:)

Walker, baseflow from the tribs.  All groundwater.  Runoff is <40%. 
Doesn't count as "groundwater" but it is.  Brevard Co has a nice study going on that now.
Thanks for the transplant info.
:)
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Pegasus

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2013, 09:19:46 PM »

Sea Grasses in the Banana River (Thousand Islands) went Crayola red and died in gin clear water. Not because of shading.
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9AMdp

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Re: THE BANANA RIVER
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2013, 11:24:02 PM »

First I've heard of that.  Anything else you remember?  Other stuff dying?

edit:  also, any approximate dates for that?  Just month and year, best estimate. 
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 07:02:13 PM by 9AMdp »
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